An Afternoon with a Certified Pinoy International Visual Artist by ALARICE FRANCISCO

Written by: Dennis Garcia
Date: September 26, 2017

The 70s was a great decade to work in advertising.

As I look back, I tell myself that I sure was lucky.

(There is a strong possibility that… maybe, just maybe, I may have caught some of the creativity in the air at that time – by osmosis.)

I was a 17-year old copy writer in an ad agency populated by some of the Philippines’ masters in art. Big names, certified heavies and real movers: Jerry Navarro, Romulo Olazo, Cris Cruz… and a quiet young artist working in a noisy corner of the art bull pen.

His name was Edwin Wilwayco and he was one of the artists who first got me interested in art when he gave me… repeat, gave (not sold) one of his earliest work.

I finally met up with him after decades of no contact… and in a span of over two hours, I got into the head of my dear friend and distilled the reasons why discriminating art lovers would readily part with their P500K and upwards to own one of his masterpieces.

Let me share my “learnings”.

 

 

source: https://chubibo.com/2017/09/26/an-afternoon-with-a-certified-pinoy-international-visual-artist/

Master Abstractionist Edwin Wilwayco Celebrates 4 decades with Coffee-Table Book by ALARICE FRANCISCO

In Photo: From the artist’s Images of Exuberance series

In Photo: From the artist’s Images of Exuberance series

Written by: Alex Pastor
Date: June 19, 2017

Painting is a discovery. Every time you make a mark on canvas, all sorts of possibilities open up and all sorts of problems to which you have to find the solutions. When you take a brush to canvas, you never know exactly the result paint is going to make. The tension of always trying to push yourself over the edge, of testing the limits of your imagination, in the hope of creating impressions distinctly your own and quite beyond anything you ever expected when you started out. Therein lies the continual challenge and beauty of the act of painting for me.—Edwin Wilwayco

The coffee-table book Edwin Wilwayco

The coffee-table book Edwin Wilwayco

THE publication of a coffee table book, itself a museum without walls, devoted to the lifetime body of works by a single artist, is always a cause for celebration.

For artist Edwin Wilwayco, it’s an affirmation of all that he has worked for. For the reading public, it’s an opportunity to view and appreciate the panoramic achievements of one of the country’s leading abstractionists.

To the not-so-knowledgeable of what abstract art is, it is simply defined by Britannica.com as “nonobjective art or nonrepresentational art, painting, sculpture, or graphic art in which the portrayal of things from the visible world plays no part” (www.britannica.com/art/abstract-art).

The Fatima University Gallery Foundation Inc. has published and launched the book, simply titled Edwin Wilwayco.  Authored by award-winning artist and art critic Cid Reyes, the book brings to the fore the struggles of a young Wilwayco, already deciding or choosing at a tender age that abstraction was the style in which he could best express himself, despite his graphic facility and fluency in representational art. Absorbing the inevitable influences of his college mentors, and enlightened by the entire history of abstraction, from Wassily Kandinsky down to Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, Wilwayco synthesized, distilled and drew, from his own experimental alchemy, his own trademark characteristics of brushstrokes, gestural marks, floral motifs and vibrant chromatics.

The book also traces the progression of his many thematic series, each one a rich exploration of expressions reflective of local culture, nationalism, spirituality, the varying seasons, music, geometric symbolisms and the mysterious gifts of nature. These are all manifested in a harmonious, but inexplicable, array of designs and patterns. Down to his older years, Wilwayco has never wavered from the restless enrichment of his vocabulary of either form or color.

Lavishly arranged by Aman Santos, coordinated by Alec Ramos, with numerous photographs by Ferdinand Rodriguez and Lovella Uy ofPhotoholict, culled from nearly a thousand works in different media, the book is distinct evidence ofWilwayco’s prolific production, proving that inspiration comes not from thin air—but from passion, determination and commitment to the vocation which Wilwayco has dedicated his life to the pursuit of abstraction painting.

  • The book is sold at Leon Gallery, Ground Floor, Eurovilla 1, Legazpi corner Rufino Streets, Legazpi Village, Makati City.

Source: http://www.businessmirror.com.ph/master-abstractionist-edwin-wilwayco-celebrates-4-decades-with-coffee-table-book/

Edwin Wilwayco’s Artistry by ALARICE FRANCISCO

Edwin Wilwayco coffee table book authored by award-winning art critic Cid Reyes.

Edwin Wilwayco coffee table book authored by award-winning art critic Cid Reyes.

Written by: Pepper Teehankee
Date: June 9, 2017

The publication of a coffee table book devoted to the lifetime body of works by a single artist is always a cause for celebration.

For artist Edwin Wilwayco, a coffee table book on him simply titled Edwin Wilwayco is an affirmation of all that he has worked for. For the reading public, the tome is an opportunity to view and appreciate the achievements of one of the country’s leading abstractionists.

The book launch gathered Wilwayco’s family, friends and collectors who have supported and appreciated his longstanding artistry.

A special exhibition of selected works from each of Wilwayco’s series coincided with the book launch. The event was emceed by Bianca Valerio, who wore a dress by fashion house Septiemerebelle, with painted-on art by Wilwayco himself.

It took more than four years for the Fatima University Gallery Foundation Inc., spearheaded by its treasurer Robbie Santos, to conceptualize and coordinate, and finally publish and launch the book.

Authored by award-winning critic Cid Reyes, the book brings to the fore the struggles of a young artist, who decided early on that abstraction was the idiom in which he could best express himself, despite his graphic facility and fluency in representational art. Absorbing the inevitable influences of his college mentors and enlightened by the entire history of abstraction, from Wassily Kandinsky down to Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, Wilwayco synthesized, distilled and drew from his own experimental alchemy his own trademark characteristics of brushstrokes, gestural marks, floral motifs and vibrant chromatics.

The book also traces the progression of his many thematic series, each one a rich exploration of expressions reflective of local culture, nationalism, spirituality, the varying seasons, music, geometric symbolisms and the mysterious gifts of nature. These are all manifested in harmonious but inexplicable array of designs and patterns. Down to his years of maturity and seniority, Wilwayco has never wavered from the restless enrichment of his vocabulary of form and color.

Lavishly arranged by Aman Santos with numerous photographs by Randy Rodriguez and Lovella Uy of Photoholict, culled from nearly a thousand works in different media, the book is a distinct evidence of Wilwayco’s prolific production. Edwin Wilwayco proves that inspiration comes not from thin air, but from passion, determination and commitment to the vocation, which Wilwayco has dedicated his life to: painting. *

(The Edwin Wilwayco book is sold at Leon Gallery. To purchase, call 856-2781. For more information about the artist, visit www.edwinwilwayco.com.)

(Follow me on Instagram @pepperteehankee.)

source: The Pepper Mill by Pepper Teehankee (The Philippine Star)

Edwin Wilwayco Feature in The Philippine Tatler by ALARICE FRANCISCO

Symphony for Robert from Scherzo Abstract Music series

Symphony for Robert from Scherzo Abstract Music series

Four Decades of Edwin Wilwayco: Master Abstractionist
Written by: The Philippine Tatler
Date: April 26, 2017

The Fatima University Gallery Foundation, Inc. publishes and a coffee table book entitled “Edwin Wilwayco” -- a look back at the master abstractionist's legacy

"Painting is a discovery. Every time you make a mark on canvas, all sorts of possibilities pen up and all sorts of problems to which you have to find the solutions. When you take a brush to canvas, you never know exactly the result paint is going to make. The tension of always trying to push yourself over the edge, of testing the limits of your imagination, in the hope of creating impressions distinctly your own and quite beyond anything you ever expected when you started out. Therein lies the continual challenge and beauty of the act of painting for me." - Edwin Wilwayco 

The publication of a coffee table book, itself a museum without walls, devoted to the lifetime body of works by a single artist, is always a cause for celebration. For artist Edwin Wilwayco, it is an affirmation of all that he has worked for; for the reading public, it is an opportunity to view and appreciate the panoramic achievements of one of the country’s leading abstractionists.

The Fatima University Gallery Foundation, Inc. published and launched the book simply entitled, “Edwin Wilwayco”. Authored by award-winning critic Cid Reyes, the book brings to the fore the struggles of a young artist who decided early on, that abstraction was the idiom in which he could best express himself, despite his graphic facility and fluency in representational art.

Snow Leopard from Fractals series

Snow Leopard from Fractals series

Merge from Images of Exuberance series

Merge from Images of Exuberance series

Absorbing the inevitable influences of his college mentors, and enlightened by the entire history of abstraction, from Wassily Kandinsky down to Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, Wilwayco synthesized, distilled and drew, from his own experimental alchemy, his own trademark characteristics of brushstrokes, gestural marks, formal motifs, and vibrant chromatics.

The book also traces the progression of his many thematic series, each one a rich exploration of expressions reflective of local culture, nationalism, spirituality, the varying seasons, music, geometric symbolisms, and the mysterious gifts of nature.

Tats Manahan consultant for the exhibition, Edwin Wilwayco, Cid Reyes author of the book, Robbie Santos of Fatima University Gallery Foundation and publisher of the book

Tats Manahan consultant for the exhibition, Edwin Wilwayco, Cid Reyes author of the book, Robbie Santos of Fatima University Gallery Foundation and publisher of the book

These are all manifested in harmonious but inexplicable array of designs and patterns. Down to his years of maturity and seniority, Wilwayco has never wavered from the restless enrichment of his vocabulary of form and color.

Lavishly illustrated by Aman Santos, with numerous photographs by Ferdinand Rodriguez and Lovella Uy of Photoholict, culled from nearly a thousand works in different media, the book is distinct evidence of Wilwayco’s prolific production, proving that inspiration comes not from thin air, but from passion, determination, and commitment to the vocation which Edwin Wilwayco has dedicated his life to: painting.

 The book is sold at Leon Gallery. A special exhibition of carefully selected works from each of Wilwayco’s series will coincide with the book launch. It will be held at Leon Gallery, G/F Eurovilla 1, Legazpi corner Rufino Sts.,  Legazpi Village, Makati City, from April 24 - 29, 2017.

source: http://ph.asiatatler.com/arts-culture/arts/four-decades-of-edwin-wilwayco-master-abstractionist

Pepper Teehankee's "Kudos, Edwin Wilwayco!" / The Philippine Star by ALARICE FRANCISCO

Loby and Edwin Wilwayco with Nel Reformina.

Loby and Edwin Wilwayco with Nel Reformina.

Kudos, Edwin Wilwayco!
Written By: Pepper Teehankee
Date: March 3, 2017

My friend, artist Edwin Wilwayco, recently mounted two shows titled Luminans and Octo Gravitas at The Gallery of 8 Rockwell building in Makati City.

Edwin’s friends from his Alpha Phi Omega fraternity at the University of the Philippines like John Lesaca (with wife Malou), former Philhealth president and CEO lawyer Alex Padilla and Abel Manliclic were present.

Also at the event to support Edwin were Dr. Marcelito Custodio from New York and Nel Reformina from Davao, art collectors Robbie Santos and Manny Faustino, artists Dominic Rubio, Vincent de Pio, Aileen Lanuza, Jean Marie Syjuco and son Julian and Leon Gallery’s Jaime Ponce de Leon.


After the shows at The Gallery, Edwin’s works were transferred to Galerie Stephanie in Quezon City (Luminans) and Galerie Joaquin in San Juan City (Octo Gravitas) for a simultaneous run.

Edwin, who divides his time between Providence in Rhode Island and the south of Manila, has developed a huge following of collectors and friends in his more than four decades of artistic journey.

Luminans’ pieces were mostly minimalist white, black and gray with accents of color. The Octo Gravitas set, with pieces resembling abstractions of the figure eight, was more colorful. Octo in Latin means eight and gravitas is weight. Both exhibits were critical and commercial successes.

 

Source: http://www.philstar.com

Cid Reyes' "Wilwayco and the Paradox of Change" / Inquirer by ALARICE FRANCISCO

Octo Gravitas” XIII

Octo Gravitas” XIII

Wilwayco and the Paradox of Change
Written by: Cid Reyes
Date: January 23, 2017

“I have to change in order to stay the same,” said Willem de Kooning, the great American abstractionist of the first generation of the New York School, who has had an early influence on the Filipino abstractionist, Edwin Wilwayco.

The paradoxical remark is a sentiment and a stimulus that much evident in Wilwayco’s two successive shows: Galerie Joaquin’s “Octo Gravitas” and Galerie Stephanie “Luminans.” Both exhibits open Jan. 24 at The Gallery at 8 Rockwell building at Rockwell complex.

“Octo Gravitas” works are clearly derived from their root words (the Latin “octo” for the figure eight, and “gravitas,” for weight, heaviness). Created at the tail end of Wilwayco’s previous “Circles” works, the numeral looking like two circles ringed together—the viewer is treated once more to Wilwayco’s brush-wielding bravura, in what may be termed a “heuristic” technique of picture-making.

Heuristic (again a Greek word, meaning “find or discover”) is “any approach to problem-solving, a learning or discovering that employs a practical method not guaranteed to be optimal or perfect, but sufficient for the immediate goals. Heuristic methods can be used to speed up the process of finding a satisfactory solution.”

Thus, heuristically, Wilwayco did in fact find a method of painting with the help of a “substrate”—a word used by the American critic Josephine Fatima Martins, who has written much about the works Wilwayco has produced while based in Providence, Rhode Island.

The same use of the substrate was made prominent in the “Fractals” series, which propelled the artist to unexpected heights of production. The substrate takes the form of a pre-designed canvas or commercial fabric, submerged in the background but insidiously makes its presence visually, serving as a fulcrum or catalyst.

In the “Octo Gravitas” works, the figure eight is emblazoned via his trademark bristling brushstrokes against the substrate of an ornamental rococo design, a staple familiar to us as wallpaper, endowing the works with an “all-overness” of countenance.

In the “Luminans” works, however, Wilwayco banishes the use of a substrate, and in a surprising volte-face, reverts to his pure thick pigments abstaining from his usual colorful palette to subsist in black, white, and gray marked only with just a nuanced shade of reds or greens.

Though the loss of Wilwayco’s coats of many colors may surprise many of his collectors, Wilwayco makes up for their absence by proving that, even by a self-imposed economy of means, he could make the noncolors resonate with a deeper spirituality through his vigorous and muscular manipulation of his pigments; drawing from their stark contrast a visual force from their raggedly, heavy-handed, almost brutish layering of pigments.

The “Luminans” works feel like an amalgamation of Wilwayco’s previous themes inspired by Nature: “Whispering Winds” “Moving Mountains” and, to a lesser extent, the “Rivercircles.” They are compactly and tautly composed, applied not with the usual flourish but with an accustomed fluency and a keen eye for the subtleties of the retinal behavior of black and white oil pigments when they have been commandeered at the service of their emitted light.

But what must an artist do for an encore?

The challenge to the artist is to ensure that he will not exhaust the easy facility of his painterly gifts, without him recognizing it refusing to be lured to the novelty of what is trendy and fashionable nor succumb to the dictates of newfangled collectors.

Meantime, Wilwayco is determined to remain guided by his own North Star, his personal Polaris, with its navigational value when many are lost on a clear night without a compass. He will continue to change only to stay the same.

Wilwayco’s “Luminans” and “Octo Gravitas” will run Jan. 24-31 at The Gallery of 8 Rockwell, Makati.

 

Source: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net

Interview with Edwin Wilwayco / Blasting News by ALARICE FRANCISCO


Interview with artist Edwin Wilwayco
Written by: Meagan Meehan
Date: September 10, 2016

Get to know the artist's how's and why's in this article by Meagan Meehan:

Edwin Wilwayco is a successful artist who is having a show at the Walter Wickiser Gallery in NYC.

Edwin Wilwayco is a Filipino artist who has enjoyed incredible success via his bold paintings which have been exhibited globally. Edwin is currently preparing for a show in New York City’s esteemed Walter Wickiser Gallery and recently spoke about his experiences as an #Artist.

Early inspiration  

Blasting News (BN): When did you become an artist?   

Edwin Wilwayco (EW): It started when my father discovered that I could draw/copy illustrations from comic books at five years old. I always loved to doodle, just like my father. I attended art school at college.

BN: Growing up, what art interested you? 

EW: I remember drawing plants, amoeba and scientific illustrations. I admire the watercolor effect; colors that gradate, ripple and flicker. I am drawn to the work of J.M.W. Turner, Matisse, Picasso, Pollock, De Kooning and Zao Wuoki. The vivid colors of the fauna back home have played a big part in my color selections.

BN: What inspires your work?

EW: My works are inspired by my fondness for nature. Anything that calls my attention, whether an image I've seen in a magazine, music that triggers my imagination, scenes that stay in my mind with reference to travel and y constant visits to museums and galleries, admiring works by different artists. Floral designs lead to me curvilinear forms found in landscapes. I see floral designs or patterns as part of the whole earth's landscape.

BN: How did you get into galleries? 

EW: I've prepared my past brochures and catalog and presented them to galleries who I think would be a good fit for my work. I'm always thinking and preparing work that is distinct.                               

BN: Do you have a favorite piece? 

EW: I make every series different from the previous ones. Evolution is the key for the moment. There are paintings done spontaneously and others with longer months to create and finish. I know when a painting is finished when I think and feel that I cannot add something to it. I think it is more the 'feeling' that helps me to decide to stop.

BN: What are your mediums of choice? 

EW: I use a brush most of the time, combined with using pallets, scrapers, sponges and whatever instruments that can help produce interesting visual results. I like to use acrylics when I start a painting. It's an experimental exploration for me. It serves to set an outline and can define the composition. Acrylic dries fast and then I can apply oil paint.

Present work

BN: How did you develop your unique style? 

EW: I prefer bright colors. I want to look at them and get a good feeling. Music plays a big role for me in creating art. When I paint I have no preconception of what I want to do. I let the painting develop according to my inner feelings and moods; this is especially so when I work early in the morning. I don't even start with a color preference. The colors in my paintings are juxtaposed for various changing effects; they challenge or echo each other.

BN: What is the most rewarding experience regarding being an artist? 

EW: The years of continuous painting, pushing myself and being recognized for having a distinct style. When I’m painting I’m not aware of what I’m doing. I just go with the flow. I have no fears of making changes, destroying the image, adding or erasing. I let the painting come through on its’ own. I believe that gesture in art must appear out of necessity--not habit. I have always found that listening to classical music sets a helpful tone and helps me to create a painting.

BN: What advice would you give to aspiring artists? 

EW: Don't lose sight, keep on painting. Be open to everything you see. Interact with fellow artists. Prayer is what sustains me and enables me to create. Look at the colors in nature and marvel in awe at the transitions of color--the sudden, seamless shift from one hue to another. Color in all its infinite variations is the very air that I breathe. As melodramatic as that sounds, that is how I feel. I will continue to paint as long as I can. #Interview #Artwork

 

Source: http://us.blastingnews.com

Edwin Wilwayco’s ‘Circles, On and On’ / New York by ALARICE FRANCISCO

Edwin Wilwayco’s ‘Circles, On and On’ opens in New York
Date: September 05, 2016

Filipino abstract-expressionist Edwin Wilwayco will mount his latest exhibit, “Circles, On and On at the Walter,” at Walter Wickiser Gallery in New York Sept. 3-28. Opening reception is on Sept. 8, 6 p.m.

Josephine Fatima Martins, an art critic for the New England magazine Artscope, writes the following review of the artist’s eight paintings for the New York show:

In “Circles, On and On,” Edwin Wilwayco achieves and continues, with determination, another chapter in his expansive and fluid visual oeuvre.

Progressing and evolving from his “Fractals” series in 2015, his new “Circle paintings” reveal and place focus on his constant explorations with curvilinear gesture, movement, repetition, spatial depth, and abundant layered-textural-color relationships.

Wilwayco’s intent is to explore conceptually the emotion and physical awareness of containment and expansion and the ever present struggle between order and chaos into infinity.
Within the series, Wilwayco groups the compositions by color. Theres’s numbered sets of blue, green, red, and orange visual narratives, each slightly different from the next or last, yet all connected to each other as chapters within the larger body of work.

In all the compositions, the fullness of Wilwayco’s solid signature and unique vocabulary is observable: bombastic color palettes as well supremely varied paint viscosity applications, some thick others thin and watery, achieve voluminous arrangements and complex interiors.

For Wilwayco, working with and adding a defined geometric form to already dynamic gestural spaces builds another layer of engagement. His circles live within or are transitioning in and out of chaos space; they are the most important component or the higher level singularity within a fractal environment—the source point. Wilwayco is trying to integrate the rules of hard-edge formalism with the potency and spontaneity of action-derived mark making.

By tackling an observable object—circle, ring, sphere, globe, dot—he is placing more emphasis on the tangible and solid instead of the ephemeral and irregular.

This isn’t the first time Wilwayco, who is defined mostly by his vibrant lyrical forms, has used preexisting defined shapes as source material. In previous compositions, such as “Fractals,” he has deconstructed geometric design and floral environments to highlight the physical reality of expanding/contracting “shift” and the impermanent quality of permanent properties.

Constant flux

In his garden and watery paintings, for example, Wilwayco documents his observations that nature is in constant repetitive flux within constructed spaces.

We see the idea and reality of flux again in “Circles, On and On.” There is a powerful sublime fluidity, massive bubbling, and an anxious dichotomy between safety and imprisonment. Within the familial circle all is safe and gestating, but it is also restrained and constricted. Wilwayco is asking: How much order do we want? How much order is healthy? Also, what happens when the circle is broken?

Always attempting to find balance, he bravely confronts and examines artificial and natural constructs as his main theme; this time, using the circle motif, as metaphor, with its myriad symbolistic earth and sky-bound meanings to guide and project questions and engage in dialogue about concerns outside of painting and art.

For Wilwayco, a painting isn’t a simple object to be admired, it’s communication. He is interested in establishing via the plastic properties of paint quality as well as line, form and color placement, the condition of “web connection” which is nirvana-istic holism, and the singularity of Enso/Zen/Void where order and chaos battle for supremacy, when the mind is uninhabited allowing the body its natural condition to be freeform expressive and creative.


Walter Wickiser Gallery is at 210 Eleventh Ave., Suite 303, New York, NY 10001; tel. +1 212-941-1817; e-mail wwickiserg@aol.com. Visit www.walterwickisergallery.com and edwinwilwayco.com.

 

Source: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net

Wilwayco’s "Great Wave" / Artes Orientes Gallery by ALARICE FRANCISCO

‘Fractal’ Attraction at Artes Orientes: Wilwayco’s ‘Great Wave’
Written By: Cid Reyes
Date: January 18, 2016
 

AS CURIOUS children we observed with rapt fascination the repeated “eyes” around the pineapple which Mother was about to peel.

Out on the beach, we lay on the sandy shore, awaiting with thrill the endless rushing of wave upon wave washing over us.

Indeed, as art students, we learned that the most famous Oriental painting was Hokusai’s “Great Wave.” More incredibly, centuries ahead, the Renaissance genius Leonardo de Vinci, in his Deluge sketches, did the same repetition of curling little waves.

These experiences and memories came rushing back to mind, yes, like waves, when we were invited by the artist Edwin Wilwayco to view his latest series of works on the theme of fractals! Fractals was first used by the Polish-born, French-American mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot in 1975. He derived the word from the Latin fractus meaning “broken” or “fractured.” Thence he “extended the concept of fractional dimensions to geometric patterns in nature.”

In the case of Wilwayco’s Fractal works, critic Josephine Fatima Martins had referred to the artist’s substrate, the underlying fabric that has been printed with fractal designs.

What Wilwayco has done to this substrate is to engage it in a skirmish of his own volition, setting up a tension by asserting his own fractal trademarks in the form of repeated furrowed lines, effected from the “combing” of a top layer to reveal the multiplicity of colors and designs underneath.

While the substrate underneath may be regarded as pre-fabricated, the artist’s armory of fractal devices are his own sheer fabrication. Between the two, the viewer perceives a contrapuntal encounter, by turns, adversarial in their competitiveness and collegial in their amicable harmony of colors and shapes. Their intensity of one is modulated by the other; each is either a heightening or a weakening of the other; the gracious give-and-take is the artwork’s awareness that the measure of
the painting’s “success” is their compatible interchange.


Contrast

Moreover, what is palpable is the contrast between the permanent state of the fabric fractals and the unpredictable fractal potentialities of the pigments, in the seemingly restless hands of Wilwayco, who has already proven himself as a master manipulator of oils.

Through four decades of oil painting, Wilwayco, who was mentored by the pioneer exponent of Abstract Expressionism in the Philippines, the late José Joya, has acquired such an identification and an affinity of feeling with the material that he can now liken himself to a juggler capable of throwing bowls of colored pigment up into the air and knowing with sureness where each will land, transforming whatever “accidents” that may ensue as being willfully ordained from the start.

For while the fractals can proceed into infinity, a series of paintings presupposes a beginning and an end. After all, Monet could paint only so many haystacks and cathedrals; the apples of Cézanne’s eyes were by then overripe; and Josef Albers knew there were limits to his squares within squares. And as for Wilwayco, he is fully aware that, whether the series continues or not, his fractal attraction will always be there to color his existence.

On the occasion of its 10th anniversary, Artes Orientes gallery at Serendra presents Edwin Wilwayco’s celebrated “Fractals” series in “Fractal Attraction.” Exhibit opening reception is on Jan. 23, 7 p.m. Artes Orientes is on the second level, The Shops at Serendra, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig. Exhibit will run until Feb. 5.

Contact 0917-5230877 or e-mail rio_ambrosio@yahoo.com.

 

Source: http://lifestyle.inquirer.net

Fractals / The Pepper Mill by ALARICE FRANCISCO

Fractals
Written by: Pepper Teehankee
Date: December 8, 2015

The 29th One-Man Show of Edwin Wilwayco is mentioned at Pepper Teehankee's article at the Philippine Star:

Edwin Wilwayco held his latest one-man-show titled Fractals at Altro Mondo, Greenbelt 5 in Makati City. The last show he had in the Philippines was in 2012. Prior to his Fractals exhibit in Makati, he had shows in Singapore and the US. 

Wilwayco’s friends and family were in attendance to see the canvases bursting with colors that the artist is known for. The show was called Fractals because Wilwayco thought that there was more to abstract art than just dragging and sloshing paint all over a canvas. “I like the idea of finding an endless repetition of fractal units that seem ‘not repetitive.’ Fractals comes from ‘fractured’ or ‘irregular’ patterns that I observe in nature,” he explains.


Wilwayco graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of the Philippines and took further studies at West Surrey College of Art and Design in England as a British Council scholar for painting.

I hope it won’t take another three years before this talented artist has another show in Manila

 

Source: http://www.philstar.com

Wilwayco / Adobo Magazine Feature by ALARICE FRANCISCO

A Brush with Advertising: Meet the Ad Men turned National Artists
Written by: Cid Reyes
Date: October 28, 2015

Included in the list of prominent figures in advertising who have now made a name in Philippine Art is Edwin Wilwayco.

Four Filipino advertising practitioners, namely Fernando Amorsolo (1892-1972), Hernando R. Ocampo (1911-1978), Cesar Legaspi (1917-1994), and J. Elizalde  Navarro (1924-1999) were proclaimed by the state  as National Artists. While the four were recognized not for their advertising work, but for their artistic masterpieces, it illustrates that many of our distinguished artists have emerged from the advertising field.

MANILA – The first declared National Artist was Fernando Amorsolo, whose passing in 1972 inspired the First Lady Imelda Marcos to bequeath the title posthumously to Amorsolo, already considered “The Grand Old Man of Philippine Art.” Unbeknownst to many, it was Amorsolo, while still a Fine Arts student moonlighting as a commercial illustrator, who had designed the iconic logo for Ginebra San Miguel. It showed the sword-wielding archangel Michael trampling underfoot the devil Lucifer—thus the product was also known as “Marca Demonio.” The label is an example of an excellent logo design that captured, literally, the spirit of the product.

Pleased with the work of the young Amorsolo, Don Enrique Zobel de Ayala, whose family was part owner of the distillery, offered the young Amorsolo the opportunity to study at the Academy of Fine Arts in San Fernando, Madrid. Amorsolo proceeded to Madrid where he was exposed to the works of the Spanish master Joaquin Sorolla, which was to be a great influence on his sun-and-shadow style of painting.

None of these artists, of course, could make a living out of their artworks then, which are now being snapped up by collectors, despite their prices escalating in the millions. No surprise then that they all had to do commercial and advertising art. But talent is truly a gift that early manifests itself. In the case, for instance of Cesar Legaspi, superb draftsmanship characterized his advertising work, done in the late 1930s, prior to the outbreak of the war. Samples of his advertising works are extant. In one interview, Legaspi narrated:

“My job was staff artist of Elizalde’s advertising department under Pete Teodoro. Elizalde & Company carried diverse products: from wine to rope, from life insurance to a steamship company. I was the only artist there, so I had to do all the illustrations for all these various products.”

In time, Pete Teodoro would put up his own advertising agency which he would name Philprom (for Philippine Promotions), thereby making it the first Filipino ad agency, at a time when the field was dominated by multinationals such as J. Walter Thompson, McCann Erickson, and Ace Compton (now Saatchi & Saatchi). Working together with Legaspi at Philprom was Hernando R. Ocampo. With his experience as a soap opera writer and director, Ocampo headed the agency’s  production department. By 1968, Hernando Ocampo and Cesar Legaspi would leave advertising work and fully devote their time to painting. It was a risk and a gamble for them, but so passionate were they for painting that there was no stopping them.

Many years later, I would work at Ace Compton with another future National Artist by the name of J. Elizalde Navarro, who was, as we used to say then, “Balik-Ace.” He was given the title of Executive Art Director. Navarro had previously worked at Ace in the late fifties and had moved to Philippine Advertising Counselors (PAC).  As a painter, Navarro’s works were then not given their due recognition. Inevitably, his advertising work influenced his art. The 60's were the heyday of Pop Art, when images from mass media, movies, advertising, and comic books dominated the scene. After Navarro’s death in 1999, he was posthumously declared a National Artist.

From PAC came a trio of art directors, from succeeding generations, who  have made their names in the world of Philippine art: Romulo Olazo, Edwin Wilwayco, and Rico Lascano.  Olazo’s name has become synonymous with the word “diaphanous” which was his long-running, lifetime series of works. Anyone who has been attending the auctions are well aware that Olazo’s works now fetch in the millions, so sought-after are they by avid collectors. (As I keep advising my overpaid advertising cronies: invest your disposable cash in art. You won’t regret it.)

Making waves in the Asian art circuit are the abstract works of Edwin Wilwayco whose large works are visibly present in the grand lobbies of local hotels. Now working full-time on his art, Wilwayco divides his time between his Providence, Rhode Island studio in the U.S., and his Parañaque home, where currently a spacious three-storey studio is rising.

Undoubtedly, there are several more advertising people doing serious painting than can be accommodated in this brief overview: Romy Singson, Lydia Velasco, and Raul Jorolan. So: is the phrase “starving artist” still current in this day and age?

To be sure, every generation will have its share of starving artists. Some of them may, in fact, be working in your agency now. As the lessons of history have shown us: treat them kindly. They may well be our future National Artists.

This article was first published in the July-August 2015 issue of adobo magazine.

 

Source: http://adobomagazine.com

Wilwayco / Art Plus by ALARICE FRANCISCO

e44fec_8e32b0446de5468f8743f004ddcab78d.jpg

Testing the Limits of Imagination
Written by: Cid Reyes
Date: Jan. 15, 2016

“Painting is discovery. Every time you make a mark on canvas, all sorts of possibilities open up—and all sorts of problems to which you have to find solutions. When you take a brush to canvas, you never know exactly the result paint is going to make. The tension of always trying to push yourself over the edge, of testing the limits of your imagination, in the hope of creating impressions distinctly your own and quite unlike anything you ever expected when you started out. Therein lies the continual challenge and beauty of the act of painting for me.”

The first time I read those statements, I thought the words were uttered by the British painter Francis Bacon, who made the astonishing remark of wanting to make a screaming mouth as beautiful as a Monet. No, they were not said by the creator of those violently twisted faces, delivered, in fact, by a rug smeared across a visage, expecting an orifice to turn into an Impressionist sunrise. The words came from someone whose process of art-making temptingly bring to mind the techniques of Bacon, rugs and all, and Monet, whose lush layers of rich pigment are now regarded universally as the progenitor of Abstract Expressionism.  

Arguably at the top of the heap of Philippine Abstract Expressionism is the US-based artist Edwin Wilwayco, in town for another exhibition, this time at the Altro Mondo Gallery. The arrangement of being domiciled in the US (where daughter Moma is studying, accompanied by his wife Loby) and then exhibiting the fruits of his solitary labor, has been quite ideal. The result of this salubrious industry was, of course, a consequence of a more intense concentration on his art. Moreover, attaining seniority in age and status has given Wilwayco a welcome vantage point where he can see his works in retrospect and re-confirm an unwavering conviction that he was indeed fated to paint until the day when, as Picasso once dramatically said, the brush falls off the hand. Only then can it be said that one’s life has arrived full circle.

One can’t help but write of the artist as a fellow journeyman in the adventure of art, for Wilwayco and this writer were both besotted with Abstract Expressionism and considered the late National  Artist
Jose Joya as a kind of artistic deity. Wilwayco did study at the UP Fine Arts under Joya’s tutelage. He also studied under Constacio Bernardo and Dr. Rod. Paras-Perez. From such mentors came the inspiration, and more importantly, the belief, that painting is a lifetime vocation. No matter that the practical way to make use of one’s Fine Arts training then was through the commercial fields of advertising and publication design.

After graduation in 1972, Wilwayco was initiated into the commercial world of advertising. (While many are wont to look down their noses on artists who worked in advertising, they will be chastened to know that such luminaries as National Artists H.R. Ocampo, Cesar Legaspi and J. Elizalde Navarro, Jose Blanco, Romulo Olazo, and Lydia Velasco got their feet wet and their hands stained with layouts and storyboards for detergents and cola drinks. This was all, of course, prior to the Digital Age.)

In 1976, Wilwayco held his first solo exhibition titled Images of Exuberance. Not surprisingly, the works were in the abstract vein, a show for which Manuel Duldulao, then riding the crest of his fame as the author and publisher of the first coffee table book on Philippine Art, wrote an effusively admiring essay. In his typical hyperventilating prose, Duldulao enthused: “Color is the pulsebeat of Wilwayco’s art. Broad ribbons of throbbing acrylic are stained, flicked and sponged to create forms and glide and melt into each other. They flow, ripple, pulse and float on the surface of the canvas in flimsy transparency that brings to mind springs, forests, galaxies and the wings of butterflies.” 


This show was followed in 1979 with a show at Sining Kamalig gallery, the so-called Flag Series, where, as the subject indicates, elements of pop and patriotism had taken over. One can assume that this was still in the wake of the pervasive influence of Pop Art that had taken the sails off Abstract Expressionism. There was, however, no evading the risk of being compared to the Flag paintings of Jasper Johns, who had commandeered the American flag for posterity. Johns depicted the American flag as flat on the canvas surface, leading to the conundrum: is this a flag or a painting of a flag? On his part, Wilwayco folded the flag in various arrangements, with the sun and stars peeking through, not unlike Cezanne arranging drapery for his apples and oranges. Alas, the disappointing reaction to Wilwayco’s Flag paintings was merely a confirmation of the  Johns’ reference. Nonetheless, to Wilwayco’s credit, Manila’s respected critics Eric Torres and Dr. Rod. Paras-Perez gave the works their positive reviews. 

ore memorably, to this writer, it was also in that show that I was first introduced to the artist. In 1982, Wilwayco was a recipient of a British Council scholarship for painting. He was enrolled at the West Surrey College of Arts, where he executed, still seemingly under the spell of Pop Art, familiar images such as hangers, clotheslines, and ropes. Upon his return to Manila, they were exhibited at the Hidalgo Gallery. In an interview at the time, Wilwayco remarked, “I did those when I was still in college. We were asked to paint something common but rarely executed on canvas. I chose those and my professor liked them.”

In 1989, Wilwayco presented his  Jeepney Fantasia Series. Wrote Dr. Paras-Perez: “If the jeepney captured Wilwayco’s imagination, it is there because it is as insistently a part of life as a flag flapping in the breeze or an ice cream cone on the pavement. It is only incidentally an emblem of the Pinoy ensibility or an indication of our roots.” As with the Flag paintings, there was a liveliness of paint handling, a delectation in the materiality of pigment in its capacity to evoke images and yet remain inert, yielding substance.

In 1992, Wilwayco introduced his Birds of Paradise series. Clearly, the artist invariably worked in terms of themes and subject matter, which, of course, starts with the artist seeking. As critic David ylvester remarked on the difference between Picasso and Giacometti, “Picasso was a quintessential finder, Giacometti, a quintessential seeker, and it seemed more virtuous to be the latter.” Providentially, Wilwayco has a gift for seeking and eventually finding subjects with which he finds an emotionally charged connection. With the Bird of Paradise (or Heliconia) paintings, Wilwayco was both internally connected to nature, as well as challenged by its uniquely flaring forms.

Eventually he executed the subject in the three-dimensional via the divider screens, as in the Oriental biombo, comprised of interlocking panels, which can be arranged or rearranged depending on the practical or aesthetic need of the interior space.

In 1998, the Vine Series emerged, the visual stimulus provided by the creeping, clinging vines that shrouded and climbed up the rafters of his Parañaque studio overlooking the garden. As the new millennium rolled in, so it seemed, did the artist. A succession of themes hovered into view: the intimate correlatives between color, nature and spirituality, as exemplified by the series titled Blues, Excelsis, Whispering Winds, Moving Mountains, Benedictus, and Gaudeamus. Like most artists who paint to the strains of music in the background, Wilwayco found inspiration in musical qualities that aspire to merge both
aurally and visually in the series titled Homage to Vivaldi and Scherzo. expressing the most universal, and thus the most vague, thing there is in Nature: its intrinsic force.”). Thence followed the nature-driven series such as River CirclesSecond Nature, In Nature’s Realm, all redolent of Abstract Expressionists whose works owed heir magnificence through the force of nature: Hans Hoffman (“I bring the andscape home with me.”),  Joan Mitchell (“I carry the landscapes around with me.”) and the master of them all, Jackson Pollock (“I am Nature!”).

On his return visit to Manila in the last quarter of 2015, Wilwayco presents yet another series, Fractals, exhibited under the aegis of Altro Mondo Gallery. What intriguing assertions and articulations of form, what visual vitality and sensation have been engendered by the stimulus of the fractal concept, is what Wilwayco has in the offing. He is obviously determined to uplift Abstract Expressionism in the country to the level of a Grand Manner, the idiom having been so bastardized to decorate countless hotel interiors. The Fractal Foundation defines the subject as “a never-ending pattern. Fractal patterns are extremely familiar since nature is full of fractals. For instance: trees, rivers, coastlines, mountains, clouds, seashells, hurricanes, etc.” Put simply, the pineapple, with its endlessly repeated “eyes,” is a fractal fruit.

When once you view Wilwayco’s Fractals, pray, do not expect to see screaming mouths as beautiful as a sunrise, or a water lily pond, but this writer will certainly wager that Bacon and Monet will approve of the show.

---

The 41st issue of the Philippines' first and only official art magazine features Edwin Wilwayco's work on the cover, available in all local bookstores.

For subscriptions, please call (+632) 721 0504 or email info@artplus.ph

 

Source: http://www.artplus.ph

Fractals / Clickthecity by ALARICE FRANCISCO

FRACTALS by Edwin Wilwayco

Altro Mondo Arte Contemporanea is pleased to present FRACTALS, an exhibition of new works by artist, Edwin Wilwayco at the Altro Mondo Arte Contemporanea gallery (3rd Floor, Greenbelt 5, Ayala Center, Makati City).

The exhibit dubbed “FRACTALS” is described by the writer, Josephine Fatima Martins as “a series” in which “Edwin Wilwayco animates his continued explorations in actualizing conceptual and material holism”.

Martins further added that “similar to the artist’s previous visual constructions, Fractals are visceral paintings demonstrating the root plasticity and versatility of paint. At the same time, they are objective abstraction in that they reference forms in nature.

They follow the modern maxim: distortion and denaturalization of reality. Visual eloquence is achieved by alternating grades of form simplification and complexity.” The effect of which is a “deeply layered textural volume and vibratory space.”

 

Source: http://dev.clickthecity.com

10 Art Exhibits You Should See / SPOT.ph by ALARICE FRANCISCO

10 Art Exhibits You Should See This November
Date: November 6, 2015

(SPOT.ph) The year is almost over, but the art scene is still bustling with creative and talented visionaries. We've narrowed down 10 art exhibits that will fuel your imagination this November.

Fractals

Edwin Wilwayco presents intuitive masterpieces that reveal the malleability of paint in his solo show Fractals. His clarity is reflected in simplifying abstract through mirroring forms with nature. Fractals are literally endless patterns that are alike in different scales and Wilwayco cleverly created rhythmic and recurring visuals for this show. Wilwayco creates volume and texture layer after layer of acrylic and oil paint.
 
The exhibit runs until November 28 at Altra Mondo.
 
Altra Mondo is at 3/F Greenbelt 5, Ayala Center, Makati City (501-3270). For more information, visit Altro Mondo’s website.

 

Source: http://www.spot.ph